Afterglow, Sky and Water, Iceland

A spectacular sunset, after sinking just below the horizon, produces an amazing afterglow as it illuminates low lying clouds and a small lake on a farm in southern Iceland.

Iceland is an incredibly beautiful part of the world that's a long, long way from my home in Melbourne, Australia. But it’s so beautiful I’ve made my way there twice and certainly plan to return.

Our first day driving around Iceland on Route One was one of the most memorable.

After a series of delays I finally left Reykjavik late afternoon and continued to drive, stopping for photos along the way, until around 3am the next morning.

The image above was made after 11pm as the sun dipped, albeit just for a short time, below the horizon. I used a 24 mm focal length on my full frame camera.

It’s a classic focal length that’s very well suited to landscape photography.

 
Into The Mist, Skógafoss, Iceland

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The Benefits Of Understanding Exposure And Contrast

As you can see the photo at the top of this post is quite a high contrast scene. While the lush fields were interesting I decided to base my exposure on the brighter sky and the reflection of the afterglow on the surface of the lake.

I knew that decision would force the darker ground surrounding the lake to render as black. However, in doing so, the shape of the lake would be emphasized as would the apparent brightness and saturation of the vividly colored water.

It was a simple, yet beautiful scene to behold. One I was glad to witness and photograph. And I'm really happy to be able to share it with you today.

One of many spectacular waterfalls just off the side of the road in Southern Iceland.

Iceland | A Country That Calls To The Intrepid Traveler

I stopped numerous times that night to explore and photograph a range of subject matter including rivers, waterfalls, lakes and dams.

It was a great adventure and a reminder of the fact that the best images are often made while on the journey and not on arrival at any predesignated destination.

The trick is to be open to possibilities, be prepared to stop and explore while, most importantly, allowing sufficient time to do so.

My first trip to Iceland involved a drive around the entire island. It was marvelous. My second trip saw me lead a landscape photography tour, which was great fun and a fantastic experience.

I’m very much looking forward to my next journey to Iceland. Maybe we’ll travel there together.

Glenn Guy, Travel Photography Guru